Don’t Tread on Anyone

3 Proofs That the Corporate Press is Complete Propaganda

Excerpt from Knowledge, Reality, and Value: A Mostly Common Sense Guide to Philosophy by Michael Huemer, Ph.D.

Credulity
Humans are born credulous – we instinctively believe what people tell us, even with no corroboration. We are especially credulous about statistics or other information that sounds like objective facts. Unfortunately, we are not so scrupulous when it comes to accurately and non-misleadingly reporting facts. There is an enormous amount of disinformation in the world, particularly about politics and other matters of public interest. If the public is interested in it, there is bullshit about it.
I have noticed that this bullshit tends to fall into three main categories.

First, ideological propaganda. If you “learn” about an issue from a partisan source – for instance, you read about gun control on a gun control advocacy website, or you hear the day’s news from a conservative radio show – you will get pretty much 100% propaganda. Facts will be exaggerated, cherry picked, deceptively phrased, or otherwise misleading. Normally, you will have no way of guessing the specific way in which the information is deceptive, making the information essentially worthless for drawing inferences.

Second, sensationalism. Mainstream news sources make money by getting as many people as possible to watch their shows, read their articles, and so on. To do that, they try to make everything sound as scary, exciting, outrageous, or otherwise dramatic as possible.

Third, laziness. Most people who write for public consumption are lazy and lack expertise about the things they write about. If a story has some technical aspect (e.g., science news), journalists probably won’t understand it, and they may get basic facts backwards. Also, they often just talk to one or a few sources and print whatever those sources say, even if the sources have obvious biases.

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Debunking Left & Right Wing Socialism (feat. Dave Smith)

There exist two blatant contradictions which roughly ninety-nine percent of intellectuals, journalists, and voters erroneously believe.

On the one hand, they say that the free market must be regulated in order to prevent monopolies. It is assumed that these monopolies would have such great power over the market that their customers would be forced to settle for products far more expensive than, and inferior to, those that would be offered under competitive market conditions. On the other hand, these intellectuals, journalists, and voters explicitly advocate that one group (government) monopolize the money supply, policing, courts, taxation, legislation, compulsory education, and a myriad of other things that we may consider to be vitally important.

Second, the vast majority of people recognize the moral legitimacy of the biblical commandments “Thou Shalt Not Steal” and “Thou Shalt Not Murder.” Yet, when it comes to the practices of taxation and war, these principles are blatantly disregarded by almost everyone. If taxation is not theft, why can only governments do such a thing? Why not simply allow all organizations, companies, clubs, churches, or individuals to issue taxes?

The Voluntaryist Handbook

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Mythology That Democrats and Republicans Still Believe! (feat. Dr. Christopher J. Coyne)

[T]he state’s power to engage in national security policy making is a “master key” because it “opens all doors including the doors that might otherwise obstruct the government’s invasion of our most cherished rights to life liberty and property.”

– Christopher J. Coyne, In Search of Monsters to Destroy: The Folly of American Empire and the Paths to Peace (p. 39)

Christopher Coyne is Professor of Economics at George Mason University and the Associate Director of the F. A. Hayek Program for Advanced Study in Philosophy, Politics, and Economics at the Mercatus Center.

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Understanding Foreign and Domestic Socialist Propaganda

…[W]e human beings, as social animals, need individual freedom to fully flourish. The equation is simple: individual freedom = social cooperation = individual and social flourishing. Many corollaries follow. To pick one, the freedom to choose with whom we will cooperate entails competition among those who wish to cooperate with any given individual.

– Sheldon Richman, What Social Animals Owe to Each Other (2020, Libertarian Institute)

Christopher J. Coyne is a Professor of Economics at George Mason University and the Associate Director of the F. A. Hayek Program for Advanced Study in Philosophy, Politics, and Economics at the Mercatus Center. His upcoming book “In Search of Monsters to Destroy: The Folly of American Empire and the Paths to Peace”, will be published by Independent Institute in December 2022.

For a list of his books visit his website: https://www.ccoyne.com/

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The Myth of “Black Essentialism” (feat. Erec Smith, Ph.D.)

Intellectuals have been particularly prominent among those who have turned the black redneck culture into a sacrosanct symbol of racial identity. This includes both black and white intellectuals, though the latter predominate numerically and in terms of influence through the media and academia. Intellectuals have promoted misconceptions of history, misreadings of contemporary life, and counterproductive notions of how to prepare for the future.

– Thomas Sowell, Black Rednecks and White Liberals (p. 52)

Erec Smith is the co-founder and co-editor of FBT, Writing Fellow for Heterodox Academy, Associate Professor of Rhetoric, York College of Pennsylvania, author of the 2020 book, A Critique of Anti-racism in Rhetoric and Composition: The Semblance of Empowerment.

Free Black Thought: https://www.freeblackthought.com/

Article discussed- How Would Black America Fare if Progressives Got Their Way? Good intentions, bad outcomes

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