The Most Dangerous Superstition – Book Summary and Analysis

The Most Dangerous Superstition – Book Summary and Analysis

The belief in “authority,” which includes all belief in “government,” is irrational and self-contradictory; it is contrary to civilization and morality, and constitutes the most dangerous, destructive superstition that has ever existed. Rather than being a force for order and justice, the belief in “authority” is the arch-enemy of humanity.   Pg. 3

 

If human beings are so careless, stupid and malicious that they cannot be trusted to do the right thing on their own, how would the situation be improved by taking a subset of those very same careless, stupid and malicious human beings and giving them societal permission to forcibly control all the others? Pg. 26

 

Perhaps most telling is that if you suggest to the average person that maybe God does not exist, he will likely respond with less emotion and hostility than if you bring up the idea of life without “government.” This indicates which religion people are more deeply emotionally attached to, and which religion they actually believe in more firmly. In fact, they believe so deeply in “government” that they do not even recognize it as being a belief at all. Pg. 29

 

If, for example, someone has a “right” to housing, and housing comes only from the knowledge, skills and efforts of other people, it means that one person has the right to force another person to build him a house. Pg. 117

 

All statists believe that the people who make up “government” have an exemption from basic human morality, and not only may do things which others have no right to do, but should and must do such things, for the (supposed) good of society. The type and degree of aggression varies, but all statists advocate aggression. Pg. 121

 

To quickly review, people cannot delegate rights they do not have, which makes it impossible for anyone to acquire the right to rule (”authority”). People cannot alter morality, which makes the “laws” of “government” devoid of any inherent “authority.” Ergo, “authority”-the right to rule-cannot logically exist. Pg. 144

 

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Why Government is Immoral – Libertarian Party Presidential and VP Nominee

Why Government is Immoral – Libertarian Party Presidential and VP Nominee

… it is a man’s right to do whatever he wishes with his person; it is his right not to be molested or interfered with by violence from exercising that right. But what may be the moral or immoral ways of exercising that right is a question of personal ethics rather than of political philosophy …

 

Murray N. Rothbard
Ethics of Liberty, p. 24

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Marxism Exploitation and Positive Rights Refuted

Marxism Exploitation and Positive Rights Refuted

Every man can enjoy the right of self-ownership, without special coercion upon anyone. But in the case of a “right” to schooling, this can only be provided if other people are coerced into fulfilling it. The “right” to schooling, to a job, three meals, etc., is then not embedded in the nature of man, but requires for its fulfillment the existence of a group of exploited people who are coerced into providing such a “right.”

Murray Rothbard

For a New Liberty, pp. 164–65

 

A simple analogy makes all “liberal” political theory collapse. If a hundred people were shipwrecked on an island, what would it even mean to say that everyone there has a “right” to food, or that everyone has a “right” to health care, or the “right” to a job, or the “right” to a “living wage”? If, for example, someone has a “right” to housing, and housing comes only from the knowledge, skills and efforts of other people, it means that one person has the right to force another person to build him a house. This is exactly what happens in a larger context, when “liberals” advocate that some people be forcibly robbed via “taxation” in order to provide “benefits” for others. The notion that people, by virtue of their mere existence, are entitled to all sorts of things – things which come into being only as the result of human knowledge and effort – is delusional. The logical result of this supposedly loving and compassionate viewpoint is violence and slavery, because if one’s “need” entitles him to something, that means that it must be forcibly taken from anyone else who has it or can produce it, if he will not supply it willingly.

Larken Rose

The Most Dangerous Superstition, pp. 117

 

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Top 10 Influential Libertarians. Sal the Agorist and Keith Knight

Top 10 Influential Libertarians. Sal the Agorist and Keith Knight

All of libertarian political thought follows from the non-aggression principle: that no one, including the government, can aggress against someone else’s person or property.

Murray N. Rothbard
Irrepressible Rothbard, p. 374

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How the Few Unjustly Control the Many. James Corbett and Keith Knight – Book Summary and Analysis

How the Few Unjustly Control the Many. James Corbett and Keith Knight – Book Summary and Analysis

To insure the dominance of the new statism over public opinion, to insure that the public’s consent would be engineered, the governments of the Western world in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries moved to seize control over education, over the minds of men: over the universities and over general education through compulsory school attendance laws and a network of public schools. The public schools were consciously used to inculcate obedience to the State as well as other civic virtues among their young charges. Furthermore, this statizing of education insured that one of the biggest vested interests in expanding statism would be the nation’s teachers and professional educationists.

Murray Rothbard
For a New Liberty, pp. 14–15

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The Morality of Consent – Murray Rothbard and Lady A

The Morality of Consent – Murray Rothbard and Lady A

Once concede the power of the people to consent as well as the natural law of “equal freedom from subjection,” and the logical consequence must be anarchism.

Murray N. Rothbard
Economic Thought Before Adam Smith, p. 279

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What is Anarchy?

What is Anarchy?

 

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… anarchism [is] a simple matter of libertarian logic.

Murray N. Rothbard
Betrayal of the American Right, p. 145

 

Once concede the power of the people to consent as well as the natural law of “equal freedom from subjection,” and the logical consequence must be anarchism.

Murray N. Rothbard
Economic Thought Before Adam Smith, p. 279

 

Once admit any right of secession whatever, and there is no logical stopping-point short of the right of individual secession, which logically entails anarchism, since then individuals may secede and patronize their own defense agencies, and the State has crumbled.

Murray N. Rothbard
Ethics of Liberty, p. 182

Libertarianism A to Z. Jeffrey Miron and Keith Knight.

Libertarianism A to Z. Jeffrey Miron and Keith Knight.

… my basic motivation for being a libertarian had never been economic but moral. … While I was convinced that the free market was more efficient and would bring about a far more prosperous world than statism, my major concern was moral: the insight that coercion and aggression of one man over another was criminal and iniquitous, and must be combatted and abolished.

 

Murray N. Rothbard 
Betrayal of the American Right, pp. 73–74

Jeffrey Miron is a Senior Lecturer and Director of Undergraduate Studies in the Department of Economics at Harvard University, as well as Director of Economics Studies at the Cato Institute. His field of expertise is the economics of libertarianism; he has advocated for many libertarian policies, including legalizing all drugs and allowing failing banks to go bankrupt.

The Case for Anarcho-Capitalism. David Friedman and Keith Knight.

The Case for Anarcho-Capitalism. David Friedman and Keith Knight.

… a land without a settled government, whether criminally anarchic or anarcho-capitalist, is almost impossible for an external power to occupy and govern. For there is no political infrastructure, no settled government to whom the occupying imperial power can transmit orders.

 

Murray N. Rothbard
Irrepressible Rothbard, p. 192

 

0:00 – Quote from Machinery of Freedom

1:01 – How would you define capitalism, and why is it morally superior to socialism?

5:26 – Why is it important to have an understanding of property?

9:10 – Why should the poor advocate capitalism/free markets?

22:45 – Does market failure justify a state?

35:24 – Does the “capitalist” exploit the consumer and worker via iPhone?

40:10 – Does freedom include positive rights? – Freedom vs. Power

47:46 – Inequality

48:23 – Define government

50:02 – Define anarchism

50:42 – Would anarchy lead to chaos? (spontaneous order) 

51:44 – Best examples of stateless societies?

55:14 – What about monopolies?

56:33 – Without government the poor would die from poverty

58:09 – Law’s Order – Most important message

59:08 – Biggest criticism of the Austrian school of economics?

1:01:37 – Most important thing you learned from…….

Adam Smith

David Ricardo

One Book for everyone to read

Milton Friedman, your father

 

 

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No Treason – Book Summary and Analysis. Pete Quinones and Keith Knight.

No Treason – Book Summary and Analysis. Pete Quinones and Keith Knight.

… my basic motivation for being a libertarian had never been economic but moral. … While I was convinced that the free market was more efficient and would bring about a far more prosperous world than statism, my major concern was moral: the insight that coercion and aggression of one man over another was criminal and iniquitous, and must be combatted and abolished.

 

Murray N. Rothbard – Betrayal of the American Right, pp. 73–74

Lysander Spooner (1808–1887) is the American individualist anarchist and legal theorist known mainly for setting up a commercial post office in competition with the government and thereby being shut down. But he was also the author of some of the most radical political and economic writings of the 19th century, and continues to have a huge influence on libertarian thinkers today. He was a dedicated opponent of slavery in all its forms — even advocating guerrilla war to stop it — but also a dedicated opponent of the federal invasion of the South and its postwar reconstruction.

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The Libertarian View: Police – The Problem and Solution. Rothbard and Brennan

The Libertarian View: Police – The Problem and Solution. Rothbard and Brennan

In short, the problem with police is they are

(a) coercively funded, any organization who’s ‘customers’ can’t opt out will get worse service than they otherwise would;

(b) a monopoly, one cannot start up a competing police agency with the state, and

(c) they claim the ‘special immunity’ of having the right to forcibly tell others what to do because politicians told them to- they can kidnap people for disobeying the laws written by government officials widely accepted to be corrupt and dishonest.

This along does not account for why the coercively funded American police are so much more likely to commit act of brutality, compared to the coercively funded monopoly Italian police. All we are trying to do here is form a foundation that is morally justified and is most likely to protect persons and property from aggressors.

 

0:00 – Quotes from Rothbard A to Z: https://mises.org/library/rothbard-a-to-z

 

11:48 – The Moral Parity thesis by Jason Brennan, Professor at Georgetown University – https://www.amazon.com/dp/0691181713?tag=duckduckgo-d-20&linkCode=osi&th=1&psc=1

 

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